What type of label is best for my product

Customers may take hot sauce ingredients seriously

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The various flavors and complexity in some specialty condiments make them attractive to experts who want to pick apart the ingredients. To play to this audience, food companies can create hot sauce and barbecue labels that are easy to read and full of color and detail. For a smaller or independent company, proudly proclaiming the ingredients is one way to stand out from the competition.

An article in One Green Planet recently looked at some of the particulars of making hot sauce from scratch, both when it comes to choosing specific ingredients and preparing them. The variety of options sauce makers have at their disposal includes not just the kinds of peppers they select, but also additives like sesame oil or vinegar. Another concern is whether to cook the sauce, since the source says "raw sauce" can be particularly potent and hot.

Reconsidering the way customers might approach hot sauce could also impact marketing strategy. The New York Post spoke to Tyler McKusick, who works at a hot sauce store called Heatonist in New York City. There, he encourages customers to sample hot sauces for sale and appreciate the way they taste, just other connoisseurs appreciate specialty foods like wine or cheese.

"We're not here just to inflict pain on people," McKusick said. "We want people to really appreciate the flavors, and find the right hot sauce for the food just the way you find the right wine."

Smaller companies that want to create high quality hot sauce labels should consider the VIPColor VP485 Color Label Printer. While it works for short and long-run label orders, the VP485 is affordable and easy to set up, allowing businesses with limited space and resources the chance to give their sauce bottles the best packaging possible.

Sweetener brand expands to create new beverage line

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According to Crain's Business Journal, the company behind the sweetener Sugar In The Raw, Cumberland Packing Corporation, is going to produce soft drinks with the "In The Raw" label. The article features an image of one of the beverage four-packs, which maintains the same white and brown colors for the logo even though it is displayed against a light green background with a detailed image resembling the texture of a woven bag.

In The Raw is known for its associations with "purer" sugar, and its new beverage line coincides with a recent motion from the San Francisco Board of Supervisors to add health warnings to ads for sweetened drinks. If it is approved in a second supervisor vote and passed by the city mayor, this could be the first action of its kind.

Seen in this light, soda advertising and packaging may benefit from being more obviously transparent and honest. The Journal quotes Joe Pawlak of the consulting firm Technomic Inc. on the possible impacts of this new drink on this industry.

"The beverage business is highly competitive," he said. "It will be a challenge to establish consumer brand awareness with this new product line without significant marketing muscle and promotional ad dollars." However, he adds that "if Cumberland starts to enjoy some success, you can rest assured the big players will develop measures to get in the game."

It is simple to create new product labels when you have a color label printer like the Primera LX900 in-house and ready to work. This printer can make attractive labels for food and beverages, and is a good choice for businesses that have a diverse range of products and packages.